For inspiration, I've just perused through a few online lists of what it means to be from upstate New York. Some of the points I can relate to, some I can't. For instance, I've never eaten a garbage plate, something that was listed for western New Yorkers. I think I've seen Guy Fieri eat those […]

For inspiration, I've just perused through a few online lists of what it means to be from upstate New York. Some of the points I can relate to, some I can't.

For instance, I've never eaten a garbage plate, something that was listed for western New Yorkers. I think I've seen Guy Fieri eat those on TV, but then again, he seems game for just about anything that's set before him.

Other sites list Wegman's as the number one reason for drawing breath in New York State. Personally, I wouldn't go quite that far. Yes, Wegman's has amazing hot food bars and in-store bakeries, but its bakery sections also exclude local brands like Friehofer's. To me, Friehofer's baked goods are a New York staple. That's why I do the bulk of my New York grocery shopping at Price Chopper, which sells Friehofer's and has awesome in-store bakeries of its own as well.

(As a side note, a live two-man band was playing in the Manlius Wegman's as my family ate dinner from the hot bar last October. I'd never before seen a live duo perform music in a supermarket.)

However, I very much agree with lists that note New Yorkers as being obsessed with Stewart's. That's me, alright. Whenever I'm traveling in the state, my eyes are peeled open for any sight of those familiar brown-and-white signs. That means outstanding iced coffee, iced cappuccino and ice cream is soon within reach. If I'm feeling particularly peckish, I will opt for fresh half-moon at Stewart's, but I usually leave that to Dippin' Donuts.

Yes, of course, I'm irked when out-of-staters immediately assume that I'm from New York City when I mention that I'm from New York. That complaint was included in the all of the “You Know You're From New York…” lists online. I've dealt with that all the years I lived in Pennsylvania, and no, it doesn't get any less irritating to hear it as time passes.

Yes, I'm amused when states south of New York panic when it snows. I'm not amused, however, when my son's school in Pennsylvnia closes, dismisses early, or has a two-hour delay for an inch or two of snow. In fact, it just happened on Monday when the school board meeting I was scheduled to cover also was cancelled. Mmmf.

How else do I know I'm from New York? It's the only place I ever feel truly at home. Why else?